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VED


from VICTORIA INSTITUTIONS, Deverkovil; ved036@gmail.com

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Chapter 23: The European Union
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Chapter 23

 

The European Union

Now I am going into a subject that surely is none of my business. But as a thing on which my intellect has naturally gone into, as a natural extension of all these thinking, I may say something on this issue. The issue is about the advisability of Britain joining the European Union. It is a union, which many in the big businesses would definitely support. Yet, it should be understood that the interests of the big businesses have always been of a trans-national character. And never can it coincide with the interests of the local people. The condition of the workers during the Industrial Revolution in England is only one   instance to be noted. And before departing from this theme, I would like to opine that Britain resolved the terrible issues, connected with the exploiting of the workers during the Industrial Revolution, amicably because the national language was English; had it been a feudal language, then nobody would have bothered about the sickening conditions of the society, and each of the intellectuals would have gone seeking his own social safety.

Beyond anything, there is a deep chasm of differing social structuring between many of the countries in the European Union, and Britain. This contention of mine is based on the premises of all the arguments I have made in this book.

I contend that if there is a joining of Britain with the rest of Europe, then Britain would come worsted. For, then the average British citizen becomes equal in dignity and stature with a lot many persons who are not allowed the same level of both by their societies.

The very physical poster of a straight back, exhibited by the British, and possibly by all English language programmed persons everywhere, would be like that of the anecdotal red-scarf for a bull. There would be a lingering query in the head's of other citizens of the Union, as to  Who are these English, that they should display so much individuality, when the whole of Europe can be so adaptable? There would be a continuing fun in provoking them, at all places where they assemble with a British identity. And it could cause flare-ups of so much intensity, that the pitched battles that took place between the British football fans and the locals, in certain nations, a few years ago, would seem like a mere dress-rehearsal.

The main thing that would provoke the person of English breeding would be on tackling the bureaucracy that would come from non-English areas. The others of the European Union would not understand why the English man should get wild when they themselves are used to more terrible nuisances from the Bureaucracy.

Another place of disturbance would be when the same professional from the English nation, get into contact with those of another European nation. Before the union, there is a definite understanding that the other is a British and hence different. But once the union takes place, both of them are equal. So, the dignified posture and the natural attribute of free communication of the English man would cause deep heartburns in the mind of the other professional who may be under social strictures, which are non-tangible. The latter would then ache to undo the individuality of the Englishman as an effective means to bring about a repair of the social and mental beating he would have endured from his own countrymen.

The ancient themes of Our one citizen is equal to a hundred British citizens, would be heard again. Just to assuage the bruised ego.

All ancient prejudices would be recorded in languages, and in many non-tangible aspects. It would be a grave mistake to forego the warnings these factors give.

And beyond all these, there is every chance that such things as Hookworms*, Rabies*, Bureaucratic corruption, Red Tape, Megalomania and many other things, the clear character of which the British may have not experienced in all vividness, would get a free visa, if Britain joins the Union.

There may be many arguments in favour of joining. Yet, the very elementary question of how long would the Union last, before it is overtaken by a gush of corruption, and inefficiency, remains. And the question of what is wrong in remaining as Britain, as it is now. Why can't the British be more vocal of what they have contributed positively to the world?

And if it is reasons, they want for joining another nation, by the same logic India would stand a better chance to be the partner. For, isn't India the 'greatest' democracy in the world? But which Englishman would even bear to think of this possibility?

Note of caution: I personally believe that it may be unwise to play into the hands of big trans-national business.



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